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Bookings






As well as the above all school attendees will receive the following:



Evening field visits (there will be a chance to attend evening tours during the week) may include:



*Please note accommodation is not provided*


        


Payment options

You can book your place for any of the weeks of the fieldschool via a number of ways:





        

Thank you

Please note that Archaeology can be quite physically demanding, so please contact to discuss any limiting factors with regard to you undertaking fieldwork. There are aspects of the course such as finds processing that are less physically challenging. Please contact us if you have any issues.

Please note we do not provide accommodation. We can provide a list of local accommodation from camping to hotels- but it is the responsibility of the individual booking on to the field school to organise their own accommodation.

Any list provided should not be seen as a recommendation by Mercian Archaeological Services CIC.


PLEASE NOTE:

By booking a place on the field school you are agreeing to abide by Mercian Archaeological Services CIC’s TERMS and CONDITIONS and by our CODE of CONDUCT.  

Click here to view full terms and conditions including our health and safety policy

*Please note accommodation is not provided*

Some information about available accommodation is provided on our Information page in order to help you in your searches. But this information should not be seen any form of recommendation or endorsement, and Mercian are not responsible for any accommodation booked by delegates.

Archaeology Field School Sherwood Forest

You will receive training and experience in many techniques of excavation,
including many Core Skills listed in the Archaeological Skills Passport:





        



Join Mercian Archaeological Services CIC in the beautiful Yorkshire Dales for this week-long training excavation, which focuses on the teaching of archaeological excavation methods.


As well as offering the very best in archaeological training and support, this training excavation is tailored towards enabling attendees to fulfil requirements of the Archaeological Skills Passport.



Bookings

To pay by cheque or bank transfer, please contact us below stating which week you wish to attend and how you wish to pay.

or If you require more information before booking please contact us via our email:


info@mercian-as.co.uk





Fieldschool booking form- choose your week, and your payment option below and click “Buy Now”

Booking:

Bainbridge Archaeological Training Excavation 2019

Bainbridge Archaeological Training Excavation 2019

At Bainbridge, Wensleydale, North Yorkshire.

Price £250 per person


Places are limited so please book promptly to avoid disappointment.


Home About Us & Contact Services Projects Publications Community Arch Testimonials Meet the Team


I’d highly recommend this wonderful field school set amongst all the history and legend of Sherwood Forest.
(KA,2018 Week B)


I wanted to thank you, Sean and David for a brilliant week at the Summer Field School at Kings Clipstone. I had a fantastic time and it was not only an extremely educational week, but great fun!”
The week really set me up for starting my Master's degree in Archaeology and thanks to Mercian, I feel prepared and excited for this new stage in my career. The course was perfectly structured, from taking us back to basics and helping us to understand key archaeological concepts to developing our knowledge of more advanced concepts. I learned SO much while having such a good laugh!”
I honestly can't thank you and recommend you all enough, I will definitely be returning for more field schools and courses! (and the lunch club!!)”.
(KF, 2018 Week A)


“Thanks for a great experience on your field school last week (20th - 24th August). As a first time experience of getting my hands dirty on a historical site it proved to be all I could have hoped for. The range of elements covered in the training gave me a valuable in depth understanding of the degree of skills involved in discovering the past history of the site…
I realise that over the 5 days we could only get an introduction to the many skills involved but it did create a desire to learn more even in someone who is just doing it for fun.
I openly admit that the experience of revealing a piece of 10th century pottery during the cleaning activity is something that gave me a real buzz. To be handling something that was made by human hands a thousand years ago was magical…
The week was a wonderful experience which was also enhanced by Roy's meals.
My thanks again to you all for allowing me to share a great 5 days and to gain so much from all your undoubted skills and enthusiasm. It has left me wanting more.”
(BS, 2018 Week C)


Thank you so much for our field school experience, it was brilliant. I am very happy to write you a testimonial from a higher education perspective, endorsing the opportunity for undergraduates.
(KY, 2018 Week C)


Thank you guys for giving so many people such a great opportunity. Absolutely fab and I learned lots! I’m glad we had the lectures too- it helped when digging to have an idea about what we were seeing when we were digging. The field trips meant we saw how King John’s Castle fit into, and changed the environment around it. It’s a pity Hong Kong doesn’t have half term, or I’d be back sooner.
(LS, 2018 Week B, via Facebook)


I just wanted to leave a review of sorts, as this was one of the most enjoyable and truly educational field schools that I’ve been to! Whether you have experience in archaeology or not, this is a fantastic opportunity to learn, in a welcoming environment; all three Mercian members are extremely knowledgeable in their various fields of expertise and are able to teach aspects of archaeology that might usually be a bit daunting in an accessible, understandable, often comical way. This is a great field school to experience a wide variety of archaeological work (surveying with equipment, digging, finds processing, site photography, plan drawing)- you get to try it all and the staff is so approachable, happy to answer questions. If you have the chance to attend this school, you’ll be happy that you did; regardless of your level of experience with archaeology, you will learn a lot, likely with a good bit of laughter along the way.
Thank you Andy, Sean & David for an excellent field school experience and I hope to return for another!

(K C-L, 2018 Week B, via Facebook)



The welcome from the Mercian team was warm, with coffee provided by Roy (the onsite caterer… I’ll say more about him and his culinary skills further on...) and the training group was a lovely mix of all ages and experience. We had a welcome talk and introductions, which was lighthearted and relaxed, then a site tour and a fascinating background history of the medieval palace site and how it functioned and related to the surrounding area. This set the field school into a lovely context as part of the long-standing research and hard work by Mercian, who are a not-for-profit, Community Interest organisation... Their ethos is outstanding. They have a firm emphasis on research, community engagement, training and education - all underpinned by their very obvious passion for the local Sherwood Forest archaeology and history.
The course itself was amazing, with depth and meticulous attention to detail in all aspects of core skills such as excavation, context sheet recording, plan and section drawing and site photography, and secondary skills such as finds processing. I loved the pottery and small finds identification sessions, and the animal, vegetable, mineral’ object quizzes....and we even got to have a go at flint-knapping at the end of the week. I think I might manage a stone tool or two now, should things get apocalyptic... :-) Seriously, it was great fun.
We learned a massive amount in the space of a week. The teaching involved not just the correct processes, but also the whys, the wherefores and often the maths (yes, maths!) behind technical approaches such as trench layout from co-ordinates, use of dumpy level, total station, and so on. Now, I don’t have a particularly refined maths brain, and it’s a (very) long time since my GCSEs but Andy presented it in such a way that we could apply and use it effectively. I was pretty impressed that his approach made it stick!
The excavation part of the course was interesting and rewarding… finding and identifying medieval pottery and other small finds on a medieval site is always exciting…
I wish I could have been there for longer! It was a fantastic experience and I came away feeling a lot more confident in my developing skills.
Now I have to talk about the food. Oh goodness me. Roy, the site caterer, is a magician. A two course hot meal every day cooked onsite in a tent, ranging from full-on roast dinners to kebabs, cottage pie and fish and chips and some rather naughty puddings. His homemade cinnamon sponge with homemade jam has custard was divine. I think there must have been some ex-army field catering experience there...but the food he produced every day was amazing and delicious.”
(KA, 2018 Week B).


Thanks folks! I had a really awesome time for that week. Andy, Sean, Dave and Mickey -- thanks so much for the endless knowledge and all subtle requests to just tell me a story. And the potatoes. I don't think I'm going to look at clay pipes the same way again... I'll definitely recommend this dig to other people and I'll watch for your future events.
(KG, 2018 Week A, via Facebook)


Just want to say thanks for a great week. I learned lots and had a great time. The week was well organised and the mix of skills, hands on experience and theory was just right. Hopefully I’ll be back sooner rather than later.
(LS, 2018 Week B)


I just wanted to say thank you, Sean and David for a very enjoyable week.  I came away buzzing with all the information you’d tried so hard to impart and determined to keep in touch with your work and community archaeology in general.  A big thank you too to the wonderful chef.
(2018 Week A)


“I so enjoyed the archaeology field school with Mercian Archaeology last year that I've been back again this week for more! Just home after a week of trench planning and digging, finds sorting, surveying and lots of concentration on flint technologies for me this year - just fantastic! Flint knapping, experimenting with tools - heaven. Andy, Sean and David at Mercian are so knowledgeably, professional and caring and are doing wonderful work at King John's Palace, it's a privilege to be part of it.
(LF, 2016 & 2017).



Feedback from previous customers at Mercian’s other fieldchools

Click here to book your place(s)

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Community Archaeology Nottinghamshire, Community Archaeology Derbyshire, Community Archaeology Leicestershire, Community Archaeology East Midlands, Mercian Archaeological     Services Community Archaeology for Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Sherwood Forest,     Leicestershire and the East Midlands. Community Archaeology Nottinghamshire, Community     Archaeology East Midlands, Community Archaeology Leicestershire. Archaeological




Mercian Archaeological Services Community Archaeology in the East Midlands

email: info@mercian-as.co.uk

2019 Dates:

Week 1: 9th - 13th

September

Week 2: 16th 20th

September



Week 1:  9th - 13h September, 2019

Book your place by paying in FULL £250:


Or


Pay £120 DEPOSIT to reserve your place:




Pay OUTSTANDING BALANCE £130:


Bainbridge Dig 2019 Week1 DEP

£120.00

Item:

Price:


Bainbridge Dig 2019 Week 1 Balance

£130.00

Item:

Price:


Bainbridge Dig 2019 Week 1

£250.00

Item:

Price:

This training course focuses on excavation and recording skills but there will also be a chance to undertake a number of techniques that make up the Secondary Skills of the Archaeology Skills Passport including:




Students at the Archaeology Field School Sherwood Forest

 Archaeological Training Excavation 2019:


As stated above this course focuses on excavation, it is suitable for all levels from beginner to experienced digger.

For those wishing to develop their skills, for students and post-graduates seeking to fulfil the practical experience requirements of their courses… for those wishing to pursue a career in archaeology, or improve their knowledge to give them the edge at work… for those looking to acquire cross-transferable skills… for volunteer diggers wishing to raise their game, impress their friends, and increase their enjoyment of archaeology and heritage through a greater skill set and knowledge base…. through to people simply wishing to learn for the love of learning…



Archaeological Skill Passport

The beautiful village of Bainbridge was formerly the administrative centre of the medieval Forest of Wensleydale, and the magnificent Bolton Castle near Leyburn dominates the valley to the east. A Roman fort looms large over the village of Bainbridge on the eastern side.

The site of the excavation is overlooked by a Late Bronze Age to Early Iron Age Slight Univallate Hillfort. This fort occupies the high ground at the top of a steep slope on the southern side of the site.

We will be concentrating our excavations on the possible medieval manorial complex to the north of this fort, which has been identified from earthworks and recently discovered pottery (see below).


The area is famous not only for its beautiful landscape, but also its world famous cheese, and as the backdrop to the television series ‘All Creatures Great and Small’.


About the site


A great starting point for information on the area around Bainbridge is the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority Archaeology webpage:

http://www.yorkshiredales.org.uk/living-and-working/historic-buildings/archaeology


A further resource relating to Bainbridge and the wider landscape is the ”Out of Oblivion - A Landscape through time” website.

This site is based on the Historic Environment Record (HER) maintained by the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority.

The aim is to “increase your enjoyment of the Yorkshire Dales and to help you understand more about the unique cultural landscape of the area created through the interactions of people and nature over thousands of years”.

http://www.outofoblivion.org.uk



Historical and Archaeological background:


The name Bainbridge comes from its location at the place where the “Cam High Road”, a Roman Road crossed the river Bain. To learn more about the Cam High Road see the  webpage http://www.outofoblivion.org.uk/record.asp?id=424.

A Roman fort overlooked this crossing and a settlement grew around the fort named ‘Virosidum’.

The modern village is  overlooked by the remains of this fort - ‘Bainbridge Roman fort and annexe’, which is located on the eastern edge of Bainbridge.

More information about the Roman Fort and settlement can be found on the following pages:

List Entry Number: 1017920 https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1017920

Historical Environment Record No: MYD4272 http://www.outofoblivion.org.uk/record.asp?id=116

Virosidvm, Roman Fort & Minor Settlement: http://roman-britain.co.uk/places/virosidum.htm


The village of Bainbridge grew in medieval times in the shadow of this fort and on the crossing of the Bain.

Bainbridge was formerly the administrative centre of the medieval Forest of Wensleydale.

The site of the excavation lies in fields to the south of the village core.

The site contains a large number of earthworks.

These include a linear holloway identified as the “Cam High Road”, a Roman Road which runs to the south of Bainbridge, and a Slight univallate hillfort dating from the late Bronze Age to Iron Age (see below).

Many other earthworks are identified as being associated with the late medieval Manorial complex for Bainbridge which is believed to have occupied the site.

Pottery discovered on mole-hills during recent topographic survey by Mercian, has suggested occupation on the site throughout the medieval period.

The excavation will be testing theories regarding the medieval occupation of the site.


Bainbridge slight univallate hillfort - Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age (eighth - fifth centuries BC)


Due to the very rare status of Slight Univallate Hillforts, and particularly one located so far north, the Bainbridge site is protected as a Scheduled Monument.


The following entry comes from the Scheduled Monument listing for Bainbridge Slight Univallate Hillfort:



“Slight univallate hillforts are defined as enclosures of various shapes, generally between 1ha and 10ha in size, situated on or close to hilltops and defined by a single line of earthworks, the scale of which is relatively small. They date to between the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age (eighth - fifth centuries BC), the majority being used for 150 to 200 years prior to their abandonment or reconstruction. Slight univallate hillforts have generally been interpreted as stock enclosures, redistribution centres, places of refuge and permanent settlements. The earthworks generally include a rampart, narrow level berm, external ditch and counterscarp bank, while access to the interior is usually provided by two entrances comprising either simple gaps in the earthwork or an inturned rampart.  Postholes revealed by excavation indicate the occasional presence of portal gateways while more elaborate features like overlapping ramparts and outworks are limited to only a few examples. Internal features included timber or stone round houses; large storage pits and hearths; scattered postholes, stakeholes and gullies; and square or rectangular buildings supported by four to six posts, often represented by postholes, and interpreted as raised granaries. Slight univallate hillforts are rare with around 150 examples recorded nationally. Although on a national scale the number is low, in Devon they comprise one of the major classes of hillfort. In other areas where the distribution is relatively dense, for example, Wessex, Sussex, the Cotswolds and the Chilterns, hillforts belonging to a number of different classes occur within the same region. Examples are also recorded in eastern England, the Welsh Marches, central and southern England. In view of the rarity of slight univallate hillforts and their importance in understanding the transition between Bronze Age and Iron Age communities, all examples which survive comparatively well and have potential for the recovery of further archaeological remains are believed to be of national importance”.


“Although the enclosing bank and ditch at this site have been affected by later agricultural works, leaving them partially levelled or in-filled, the hillfort remains identifiable and will retain significant archaeological remains”



The entry gives further details about the site itself:


“This hillfort is situated on a natural spur above the River Bain. It is oval in plan, 41m in diameter overall and enclosed by a single ditch averaging 6m wide and 1m deep at its deepest point on the west edge. It becomes less distinct on its east side and near the field wall which bisects the site, where it is barely visible. An outer upcast bank is very distinct on the west side where it stands 1.2m above the base of the ditch. Much of this bank has been ploughed out on the north east and east sides and merges with the slope to the south and north. Excluded from the scheduling is the modern field wall which traverses the monument, although the ground beneath it is included”.



https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1009323



















Picture: The Bainbrige Slight Univalate Hillfort, Late Bronze age to Iron Age, viewed from the South. LiDAR Composite DTM - 1m data hillshade image created in GIS. Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.





































The Bainbrige Slight Univalate Hillfort, Late Bronze age to Iron Age, viewed from the South-southwest. LiDAR Composite DTM - 1m data hillshade image created in GIS. Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

























Bainbridge Univallate hillfort with the later Roman Fort situated on the hill to the northeast. LiDAR Composite DTM - 1m data hillshade image created in GIS. Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.




Fieldwork has begun at the site in 2018 with a topographic survey by Mercian, as well as LiDAR analysis and other desk-based historic map work and research.


Alongside this a photogrammetric survey was very kindly undertaken in May 2018 by Tony Hunt of Yorkshire Archaeological Aerial Mapping ( http://www.yaamapping.co.uk/). Some of the results can be seen below.
















Photogrammetric survey from a drone, undertaken by Yorkshire Archaeological Aerial Mapping, http://www.yaamapping.co.uk/













Photogrammetric survey from a drone, showing cross-section of hillfort,  undertaken by Yorkshire Archaeological Aerial Mapping, http://www.yaamapping.co.uk/













Photogrammetric survey from a drone, showing cross-section of hillfort,  undertaken by Yorkshire Archaeological Aerial Mapping, http://www.yaamapping.co.uk/













Photogrammetric survey from a drone, undertaken by Yorkshire Archaeological Aerial Mapping, http://www.yaamapping.co.uk/



Previous Archaeological work:


Test-pitting 2018

The village of Bainbridge was recently subject to a Community Archaeology test-pitting project in 2018; managed by the Community Heritage Officer at the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority (YDNPA), Rebecca Cadbury-Simmons, on behalf of the Yorkshire Dales Young Archaeologists Club along with local schools and community groups. The project was funded by the YDNPA’s Sustainable Development Fund.

A 5,000 year old flint arrowhead, an almost complete Roman-era pot, and a bullet from a Lee Enfield British Army rifle were among the 12,000 ‘finds’ uncovered in Bainbridge last year during the ‘We Dig Community’ archaeology project”.

Bainbridge Big Dig – the results can be seen at: http://www.yorkshiredales.org.uk/living-and-working/other-services/press-office/news/recent/bainbridge-big-dig-the-results


Topographic survey


Steve Moorhouse

Steve Moorhouse undertook a survey of the site in the 1990s which was published in 2003.

(Moorhouse, S. 2003. Medieval Yorkshire: a rural landscape for the future. In, (Manby, T. G., Moorhouse, S. & Ottaway, P. 2003. The Archaeology of Yorkshire: An assessment at the beginning of the 21st century. Yorkshire Archaeological Society Occasional Paper No.3. pp 181-214).


2018- Mercian Archaeological Services CIC

In two phases during 2018 Mercian have begun surveying areas in the western part of the site not previously surveyed by Steve Moorhouse. Pottery discovered during these surveys (mentioned above) suggests occupation at the site across the medieval period.





Week 2:  16th - 20h September, 2019

Book your place by paying in FULL £250:


Or


Pay £120 DEPOSIT to reserve your place:




Pay OUTSTANDING BALANCE £130:


Bainbridge Dig 2019 Week 2 DEP

£120.00

Item:

Price:


Bainbridge Dig 2019 Week 2 Balance

£130.00

Item:

Price:


Bainbridge Dig 2019 Week 2

£250.00

Item:

Price:

Bainbridge Archaeological Dig Bainbridge Archaeology North Yorkshire Bainbridge Archaeology Training Dig Bainbridge Archaeology Dig Bainbridge Archaeology

Views around the site and across Wensleydale.

Bainbridge Archaeology

Everyone is welcome… no previous knowledge or experience is required…

Information about Bainbridge and Wensleydale.


You can find out all about the village of Bainbridge via Yorkshire Dales Website at:




 https://www.yorkshiredales.co.uk/villages/bainbridge


 Information on the nearest town and shops:


The Town of Hawes:

https://www.yorkshiredales.co.uk/towns/hawes


The Village of Askrigg:

https://www.yorkshiredales.co.uk/villages/askrigg


Please note Mercian are not responsible for accommodation and do not recommend anywhere in particular to stay.



Bainbridge Archaeology

*Please note accommodation is not provided*



Mercian Archaeological Services CIC

Specialists in Community Archaeology, Public Involvement, Research & Training


Community Archaeology Nottinghamshire, Excavation, Research, Volunteering, Community Archaeology Derbyshire, Training, Social, Learning, Community Archaeology Leicestershire, Heritage, Involvement, Belonging, Knowledge sharing, Community Archaeology Lincolnshire, Topographic Survey, Talks and Presentations, Outreach, Archaeology Projects , Open Days, Schools, Finds Processing, Day Schools, Field Schools, Young People, Archaeology and History of Sherwood Forest, Pottery Research, Medieval, Roman, Prehistoric, Community Interest Company, Community Archaeology Nottinghamshire.



Community Archaeology in Nottinghamshire

Community Archaeology in Derbyshire

Community Archaeology in Leicestershire

Community Archaeology East Midlands

Community Archaeology in Lincolnshire


© Mercian Archaeological Services CIC 2013. Registered Business No. 08347842. All Rights Reserved.

Community Archaeology in Yorkshire

If you are coming to our field school and staying in Wensleydale, why not  stay a while and have a look at some of the other things there are to do in this beautiful landscape…



You can follow us on social media at:


http://www.facebook.com/Mercianarch

http://twitter.com/MercianArch


Places to visit of interest near Bainbridge:


Gayle Mill


Aysgarth Falls https://www.yorkshire.com/view/attractions/leyburn/aysgarth-falls-tourist-information-centre-1164903


St Oswald’s Church, Askrigg http://www.st-oswalds.co.uk/


Hawes ropemakers http://www.ropemakers.co.uk/


Middleham Castle https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/middleham-castle/


Bolton Castle - http://www.boltoncastle.co.uk


Bolton Abbey Estate - https://boltonabbey.com


Fountains Abbey - National Trust - https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/fountains-abbey-and-studley-royal-water-garden


Pendragon Castle - http://www.yorkshiredales.org.uk/visit-the-dales/things-to-see-and-do/top-10-places-to-see/pendragon-castle


Richmond Castle -  https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/richmond-castle


Ribblehead Viaduct - http://www.yorkshiredales.org.uk/visit-the-dales/things-to-see-and-do/top-10-places-to-see/ribblehead-viaduct


Ripley Castle - https://www.ripleycastle.co.uk


Dales Countryside Museum - http://www.dalescountrysidemuseum.org.uk



Historic market towns:


Harrogate https://www.visitharrogate.co.uk/


Ripon (including Ripon Cathedral) https://www.visitharrogate.co.uk/in-the-area/ripon


Richmond (including Richmond Castle and museums) https://www.richmond.org/


Grassington https://grassington.uk.com/


Sedbergh https://www.sedbergh.org.uk/



City shopping:


Leeds, also visit the armouries Museum at Leeds https://royalarmouries.org/


York, including a visit to York Minster (and the remains of the Roman fort) and the Yorkshire Museum.



For food and drink lovers:


Wensleydale Creamery - https://www.wensleydale.co.uk


Yorkshire Dales brewing company, Askrigg http://yorkshiredalesbrewery.com/


Black Sheep Brewey - https://www.blacksheepbrewery.com/#sr=g&m=o&cp=or&ct=-tmc&st=%28opu%20qspwjefe%29&ts=1408107273


Humble pie Fawcett and Guy, Askrigg http://humblepieyorkshire.co.uk/


Elijah Allen, Hawes http://www.dalelicious.co.uk/food/elijah-allen-son/





Please have a look at the Information page for more details to enable you to come along and join the fieldschool, and to get the most out of the experience.


The page contains information on getting to the site, ideas about where to stay, what to wear, what to bring, and more.